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April 1939

DENTAL CARIES AMONG ESKIMOS OF THE KUSKOKWIM AREA OF ALASKAI. CLINICAL AND BACTERIOLOGIC FINDINGS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Bacteriology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(4):871-893. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990040135010
Abstract

It is recognized, as a consistent result of the studies of many observers, that primitive peoples in widely scattered areas of the world are little subject to dental caries until they come into contact with civilized races and adopt some of their habits, when they suffer markedly increased incidence of decay. Such observations have been reported particularly of Eskimos,1 and also of African natives,2 New Zealand

(Footnotes continued on next page) Maoris,3 Hawaiians,4 Samoans,5 Chinese6 and a number of white peoples isolated from contact with the modern world.7 There is general agreement, furthermore, that the factors responsible for the observed phenomena are principally, if not entirely, dietary, but attempts to go beyond this point to a more precise interpretation of the data have yielded only conflicting views, which collectively permit no judicious conclusion. For example, the characteristically high protein, high fat, low carbohydrate

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