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May 1939

DENTAL CARIES AMONG ESKIMOS OF THE KUSKOKWIM AREA OF ALASKAII. BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STIMULATED SALIVA CORRELATED WITH DENTAL CARIES AND OCCURRENCE OF SALIVARY CALCULUS

Author Affiliations

WITH THE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE OF MARY SEGALL NEW YORK
From the Departments of Biological Chemistry and Bacteriology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the School of Dental and Oral Surgery, Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(5):1026-1034. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990050032003
Abstract

The marked contrast that exists between Eskimos free from dental caries and those among whom the disease is prevalent, as noted in the previous report in this series,1 makes them particularly desirable as subjects for investigation of the disease, especially in the search for differences to which causative significance may be attached. This report presents the findings in a study of certain chemical characteristics of stimulated saliva of Eskimos with and without dental caries, following the lines indicated in a previous report by one of us.2 The previous findings showed that the stimulated saliva of persons free from caries differs in several respects, in group averages, from that of persons with active caries. The group without caries yielded higher average values for total calcium, inorganic phosphate, carbon dioxide capacity and percentage of calcium removed after the specimen was shaken with tricalcium phosphate, Ca3 (PO4)2, while

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