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January 1940

GLUTATHIONE AND RED CELLS IN THE BLOOD IN INFANCY AND IN CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the New York Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1940;59(1):97-106. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.01990120099010
Abstract

Glutathione (a tripeptide of cysteine, aminoacetic acid and glutamic acid) is widely distributed in both animal and plant life. In living cells it is present mostly in the reduced form (—SH), and because of its high reducing power a role in biologic oxidation-reduction reactions has been claimed for it.1 Evidence has been presented of its importance in enzyme activity and protein metabolism,2 and various investigators3 have shown that sulfhydryl substances are accumulated in the young, growing parts of plants and are diminished or absent in the mature parts.

The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the levels of blood glutathione at various ages during infancy and childhood and to note its correlation with other constituents of the blood. This seemed particularly desirable because of recently increased specificity of methods of determination of glutathione and because of the paucity of studies of blood concentrations in these

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