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Case Reports
August 1940

SPEECH REHABILITATION FOLLOWING EXCISION OF THE TIP OF THE TONGUE

Author Affiliations

Director of Speech Clinic, State Teachers' College SLIPPERY ROCK, PA.
From the Speech Clinic of the State Teachers' College.

Am J Dis Child. 1940;60(2):368-370. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.02000020122013
Abstract

It has been frequently assumed that disorders of speech caused by oral deformities are incurable if the defect persists after surgical intervention or if the deformity is inoperable. The following clinical case is presented to show the value of and possibilities for speech rehabilitation in such instances.

REPORT OF CASE  A 10 year old boy in whose speech the lip sounds p, b, f, v, m and w were substituted for all other consonant sounds was brought to the speech clinic; all the vowel sounds were normal. Examination of his mouth showed that the tongue was about half the normal width and that the tip was missing. The tongue appeared to be about one-third the normal size and had a heavy film. Further testing showed that there was practically no voluntary motion of the tongue, and it seems likely, in view of the nature of the thick coating, that there

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