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November 1940

ANTHROPOMETRY IN CHILDRENPROGRESS IN ALLERGIC CHILDREN AS SHOWN BY INCREMENTS IN HEIGHT, WEIGHT AND MATURITY

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND; NEW ORLEANS
From the Asthma, Hay Fever and Allergy Foundation.

Am J Dis Child. 1940;60(5):1058-1066. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.02000050042005
Abstract

The dramatic nature of severe allergic conditions focuses the attention of the physician and the patient on treatment of the immediate symptoms. When these have been controlled, attempts are made to learn the causes of the attack and to institute measures to prevent future symptoms. If these attempts are successful and no troublesome symptoms occur, the physician is usually satisfied with the result, despite the fact that the patient may be far from well in the sense of the fulfilment of his potentialities of health. In the adult such a result may be quite satisfactory, since, as Todd1 has pointed out, "whatever we may do for the adult is but repair work for today." But the child is the citizen of tomorrow. His adult status will be determined by his reaction to the various influences to which he will be exposed during his period of growth and development.

That

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