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January 1941

A TOXIC FACTOR IN THE STOOLS OF PATIENTS ILL WITH POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Division of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1941;61(1):35-40. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000070044003
Abstract

It has been suggested that there is a toxic factor in the stools and urine of patients with poliomyelitis,1 the effects of which can be neutralized by the previous injection of convalescent poliomyelitis serum, although not by serums obtained during the acute stage of the disease.2 Kramer and associates3 have alluded to this toxic factor. It causes depression of the rabbit's intestine—a depression which is prevented by convalescent poliomyelitis serum.4 No specimen obtained from human beings ill with other contagious diseases, except influenza, contains a like factor. It has been found in the stools of monkeys ill with experimental poliomyelitis and not in those of normal animals.

The colon bacillus is present in these fecal specimens, and in this connection it has been shown that as patients with poliomyelitis become better there is a rise in the agglutinin titer of their blood serums against enteric organisms.

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