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Case Reports
April 1941

HAND-SCHÜLLER-CHRISTIAN DISEASEA CASE IN WHICH LYMPHADENOPATHY WAS A PREDOMINANT FEATURE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; ELIZABETH, N. J.
From the Department of Pediatrics of Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, Service of Dr. Béla Schick, and the Department of Pediatrics of the Elizabeth General Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1941;61(4):759-769. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000100093011
Abstract

Reports of cases of Hand-Schüller-Christian disease are so numerous and the clinical symptoms characteristic of the malady so well known that the addition of another case to the literature seems justified only because it presented unusual clinical and pathologic features.

REPORT OF CASE  H. G., the first child of 25 year old Scotch-Irish parents, was delivered normally at full term. For the first three months, he was breast fed, after which he was given a mixture of cow's milk with dextrin and maltose. His succeeding diet was the one usual for his age. He received the standard amounts of orange juice and cod liver oil, and his appetite remained good until his entrance to Mount Sinai Hospital, at the age of 9 months. His growth and development were normal, and there was no history of illness. He sat up at 5 months, stood up in his crib at 8 months

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