[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
August 1941

DELAYED DEVELOPMENT OF ANTIBODY TO STAPHYLOCOCCUS TOXIN IN DIABETIC CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Pediatrics, University of California School of Medicine, and the Research Laboratories of the Mount Zion Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1941;62(2):346-351. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000140117009
Abstract

The problem of the decreased resistance to infection of the patient with poorly controlled diabetes has been investigated from a variety of viewpoints.1 Richardson2 demonstrated that in depancreatized cats there was a lowered nutritional state, accompanied by a decrease in the liver glycogen, which led to low serum agglutination titers after injection of Bacillus typhosus vaccine. The organs of those animals in which there were present several alterations in the body chemistry commonly found in the diabetic patient were definitely more susceptible to dissemination from the focus of infection in the skin than those of normal controls. When the cats were given insulin and were well fed there was no difference between the diabetic and the normal animals in their capacity to produce agglutinins against the typhoid bacillus.

Studies of the production of antistaphylolysin after injection of staphylococcus toxoid were made on a series of diabetic patients by

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×