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October 1941

SENSITIVITY TO HORSE SERUM DUE TO PREVIOUS INJECTIONS OF ANTIGEN

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Division of Contagious Diseases and the Department of Medicine, City Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1941;62(4):765-775. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000160066008
Abstract

There have been conflicting reports concerning the reactions which follow the injection of serum into subjects who have previously received prophylactic or therapeutic doses of the same agent. Hooker and others1 expressed the belief that the small amount of horse serum contained in diphtheria toxin-antitoxin was enough to sensitize some subjects to that antigen. Although others2 have not denied this possibility, they have expressed the opinion that such small amounts of horse serum as are contained in toxin-antitoxin mixtures are of no practical importance in inducing sensitization.

The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain by cutaneous and ophthalmic tests (1) whether persons previously given toxin-antitoxin or serum had become sensitized to horse serum, (2) whether more positive reactions to tests for sensitivity to horse serum are obtained from persons previously given serum than from those not so treated and (3) whether there is any relation between the

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