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Case Reports
December 1942

ARTERIOVENOUS ANGIOMA OF MANDIBLE AND RETINA WITH PRONOUNCED HEMATEMESIS AND EPISTAXIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Children's Division of the Cook County Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics and Ophthalmology (Rush), University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1942;64(6):1023-1029. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1942.02010120063006
Abstract

Epistaxis is a common symptom in childhood and frequently is accompanied by emesis of swallowed blood. When the underlying cause of these symptoms is an arteriovenous angioma of the mandible associated with a similar lesion of the retina, the case is of sufficient interest to merit report. Spurious epistaxis and hematemesis with the underlying lesion an angioma of the mandible have been reported by Broderick and Round1 and Kroh.2 These men reported instances in which fatal hemorrhage followed the extraction of a loose molar tooth.

The combination of a cavernous angioma of the mandible with an arteriovenous angioma of the retina has not been heretofore reported. Ocular conditions resembling that in this patient have been found by Krug and Samuels,3 Feig4 and Wernche.5 In the patients of the two last-mentioned authors the malformation was discovered incidentally during a routine examination and did not affect the

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