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April 1943

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERISTICSSTUDY OF THEIR DEVELOPMENT IN MALES FROM BIRTH THROUGH MATURITY, WITH BIOMETRIC STUDY OF PENIS AND TESTES

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
From the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Morrisania City Hospital and Mount Sinai Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1943;65(4):535-549. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1943.02010160019003
Abstract

In view of the complexity of the process of growth and maturation, it is not surprising to find great variations among normal boys as to the time of onset of pubescence, the rate of development and the ultimate size of the genitalia. This study was undertaken in an attempt to ascertain the actual variations among normal boys and men as to the size of the testes and of the penis and the degree of development of secondary sexual characteristics.

The primary sexual organs are essentially the gonads, but we shall accept the broader classification, which includes all the organs required for procreation. These in males are the testes, the epididymides, the seminal vesicles, the prostate and the duct systems. In children these primary sexual organs differ considerably in size and structure from those of adults, since they do not as yet exercise their specific function. They are maintained in a

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