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Progress in Pediatrics
August 1943

TREATMENT OF HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE INFECTIONS AND OF MENINGOCOCCIC AND PNEUMOCOCCIC MENINGITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pediatrics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Am J Dis Child. 1943;66(2):172-187. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1943.02010200074010
Abstract

Incredible as it may seem, five years ago the accepted routine in most hospitals for any patient found to have cloudy spinal fluid by gross inspection was the immediate intrathecal administration of antimeningococcus horse serum. This reflects the hopeless attitude which was shared by all regarding the treatment of pyogenic meningitis other than that caused by meningococci. Moreover, the mortality of meningococcic meningitis varied from 20 to 50 per cent in representative series. Serum was used according to methods now viewed as inadequate for the evaluation of antibody as a therapeutic agent: First, it was assayed by agglutination tests, and these were performed by methods which it is now known failed to detect type-specific antibody; second, no effort was made to adapt the size of the dose to the severity of the infection or to check the sufficiency of a given dose of serum after it had been administered; third,

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