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December 1943

ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION OF BLOOD IN THE TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Division of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University.

Am J Dis Child. 1943;66(6):605-606. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1943.02010240010002
Abstract

Ultraviolet rays kill poliomyelitis virus.1 They also detoxify and inactivate bacteria and toxins. Perhaps blood, which is capable of absorbing ultraviolet rays, would give off secondary emanations which would destroy virus in vivo.

Macaca mulatta monkeys were given poliomyelitis virus intracerebrally and treated as follows: For each treatment, 2 cc. of blood per pound (4.5 Kg.) of body weight was withdrawn from the femoral veins and citrated with one part of 2.5 per cent solution of sodium citrate to five parts of whole blood. It was then run through the irradiation chamber, a labyrinth of beveled plates (to insure thorough turbulation of the blood) and a quartz glass window. Through the latter, held at approximately contact distance from the burner, the ultraviolet rays from a water-cooled ultraviolet generator act on the blood. The blood was then returned to the vein of the monkey through sterile rubber tubing. The rate

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