[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.187.2. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
October 1944

THE BONE MARROW AS AN ALTERNATE ROUTE FOR TRANSFUSION IN PEDIATRICS

Author Affiliations

JAMAICA, N. Y. BROOKLYN
From the Department of Pediatrics of Queens General Hospital, Jamaica, N. Y.; Director, Dr. Henry A. Reisman.

Am J Dis Child. 1944;68(4):253-256. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1944.02020100025006
Abstract

Henning1 was the first to use the bone marrow as a route for transfusion. He tried to visualize the structure of the sternal bone marrow by the injection of watery contrast substances, such as abrodil (monoiodomethane sulfonic acid) and iopax (sodium salt of α-oxo-β-iodopyridine-N-acetic acid), and failed because of the comparative density of the sternum. On the other hand, postmortem experiments showed that the presence of contrast substances could be noted in both internal mammary veins after injection into the sternal bone marrow. When denser contrast substances, such as iodized sesame oil, were injected into the sternum, they were visualized roentgenologically. It was found that substances injected into the bone marrow entered the general circulation apparently unchanged and almost as rapidly as when injected intravenously. Tocantins and his associates2 have shown that when mercury is injected into the bone marrow the metal may be seen by fluoroscopy to

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×