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Case Reports
December 1944

HAIR LACQUER DERMATITIS IN INFANTS FROM CONTACT WITH MOTHER'S HAIR

Author Affiliations

Long Island College of Medicine BROOKLYN
From the Cardiac Clinic, Bushwick Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Am J Dis Child. 1944;68(6):409. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1944.02020120043008
Abstract

Dermatitis caused by hair lacquer has by now become recognized as a well defined clinical entity. The condition has been described mostly in women who use the lacquer to keep hair in place, a matter of some difficulty in the case of the present fashionable "upswept hair-do." Some instances have been reported in young children,1 in whom the lacquer was used presumably for the same function, as a hair dressing. This communication reports 2 cases in which infants of less than a year were affected. Since the lacquer was not applied directly to the victims' hair, the diagnosis was considerably more difficult than in the usual case of this disorder.

The pathogenesis of this dermatitis has been studied in detail by Schwartz.2 Hair lacquer in use before the war contained shellac, which seems to have produced dermal reactions very seldom. Since then, synthetic resins, combinations of rosin and

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