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June 1945

EFFECTS OF SEVERE RICKETS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD ON SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C. NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Children's Bureau, United States Department of Labor, and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1945;69(6):339-345. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1945.02020180003001
Abstract

A group of 10 children who in early childhood had shown evidence of severe rickets in roentgenograms of the wrist1 were reexamined in adolescence with a view to determining the effect of early rickets on their skeletal development. These 10 subjects were selected because they were examples of the most severe and prolonged type of rickets occurring in early childhood and not because of any special abnormalities in adolescence. Six of the children were boys, and 4 were girls; 9 (all of Italian parentage) were white, and 1 was a Negro.

Each adolescent child received a physical examination; the sitting height and the standing height were measured and pelvic roentgenograms were made.2

Case 1.—Figure 1 A shows a boy (P. C.) who entered the New Haven Hospital at the age of 2½ years. When he was admitted to the hospital he was not able to stand, and the

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