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January 1946

SUCKING RESPONSE OF NEWLY BORN BABIES AT BREASTA Study of Fifty Cases

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Pediatrics, Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Rochester Child Health Project.

Am J Dis Child. 1946;71(1):41-44. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1946.02020240048004
Abstract

IN order to learn more about the response of the normal baby to the breast and in order to interest more mothers in the breast feeding of their babies, observations were made on the sucking response of 50 newly born babies at the breast. Sucking, aided by nuzzling and lip reflexes, is a determining factor in successful breast feeding. Stroking the lip or cheek arouses these reflexes, causing the baby to turn his head toward the source of stimulation. A satisfactory response is stimulated further if the breast of the mother has a nipple that can be seized and drawn out and if the mother cooperates in presenting the breast to the baby.

The feeding response of 50 consecutive full term, normal babies was studied intensively. The infants were observed at the breast three to five times daily during their stay of nine or ten days in the hospital. One

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