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October 1946

SPEECH THERAPY FOR CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO; URBANA, ILL.

Am J Dis Child. 1946;72(4):389-398. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1946.02020330021004
Abstract

IT HAS been estimated that about 75 per cent of all children with cerebral palsy have speech defects and that from 50 to 75 per cent of these children can be benefited by speech training.1 The value of such training cannot be overestimated. It is a vital part of the rehabilitation program because speech gives the child a chance to express himself, and, consequently, to acquire a more pleasing personality; it stimulates mental growth, and it improves his chance of becoming self supporting. In the case of some persons who, as a result of severe generalized involvement, are bedridden or confined to a wheel chair, speech is of prime and greatest importance—greater than self help or locomotion.

The purpose of this paper is to comment on some of the various types of speech defects which are found and to suggest certain therapeutic measures to be used in dealing with

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