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Case Reports
October 1946

FRACTURE WITH OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE MANDIBLE IN A NEWBORN INFANT

Author Affiliations

LOUISVILLE, KY.
From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville School of Medicine, services of Dr. James W. Bruce and Dr. W. W. Nicholson.

Am J Dis Child. 1946;72(4):411-414. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1946.02020330043006
Abstract

OSTEOMYELITIS of the superior maxilla in the newborn infant is uncommon, while osteomyelitis of the mandible is extremely rare.

Wilensky1 (1932) reviewed the literature of osteomyelitis in infants and suggested that it be separated from the general subject of osteomyelitis because it is more or less a definite clinical entity. His communication dealt with acute osteomyelitis of the jaws, both upper and lower, which occurred most commonly in the first weeks or months of life. The cause was generally considered to be bacterial, the organisms being staphylococci, streptococci and coliform bacilli. The sources of the infecting organisms were listed as: (1) the vaginal canal of the mother; (2) the fingers of the accoucheur or the nurse; (3) the nipples and breasts of the mother, and (4) the fingers or apparatus used in cleansing the baby's mouth after birth. The question of the mechanism by which the infection is introduced

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