[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
May 1947

CUTANEOUS TESTS AND IMMUNIZATION IN DIPHTHERIA AND SCARLET FEVER

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Jack and Heinz Laboratories, the Department of Contagious Diseases, City Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University.

Am J Dis Child. 1947;73(5):531-542. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1947.02020400002001
Abstract

CUTANEOUS testing for susceptibility to diphtheria and scarlet fever has been a widespread practice for many years. The reliability of the former is generally accepted. To immunize against diphtheria three antigens are now in use. Immunization of certain groups of persons, especially nurses and physicians, against scarlet fever is practicable,1 but the reactions encountered in giving Dick toxin have been such that it has never become officially recommended as public health procedure. The following report is a survey of twenty years of cutaneous testing and immunization of student nurses at the contagious department of Cleveland City Hospital.

Since 1925, all student nurses who entered contagious service have been given Schick and Dick tests routinely. Those who had positive reactions were immunized against the antigen to which they were susceptible. For about ten years all tests and injections for our own and for nurses from other hospitals affiliated with City Hospital

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×