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August 1947

RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF RECURRING CONVULSIVE ATTACKS OF EPILEPSY

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Pediatrics, the Mayo Clinic.

Am J Dis Child. 1947;74(2):140-146. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1947.02030010148003
Abstract

WHILE it is true that the therapeutic armamentarium for recurring convulsions (epilepsy) is better than it was before 1900, the principles of treatment have not changed much in the last few decades. Whereas from 1853 to 1912 bromide was the chief anticonvulsant drug, the relatively effective and nontoxic phenobarbital, introduced in 1912, a near relative "mebaral" (n-methylethylphenylbarbituric acid), and the even newer drug diphenylhydantoin sodium U. S. P. ("dilantin sodium") are now available. There are, of course, many other drugs that have been tried, but most physicians rely on these alone or in combination to control epileptic attacks.

In addition to drugs, the ketogenic diet1 has proved an effective method of treating children who have epileptiform convulsions.

Treatment of such children is especially important. Lennox,1a of Harvard Medical School, stated before a subcommittee of the Congress of the United States on May 24, 1945:

Because epilepsy is predominantly

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