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March 1948


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From the Cook County Children's Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1948;75(3):309-315. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1948.02030020321004

THE LITERATURE on the so-called self-demand schedule of infant feeding during the last years has shown an increasing trend toward allowing infants to regulate their own feeding with regard to time, amount and kind of food intake. This practice is quite in contrast with former rigid feeding schedules, which, in turn, were an understandable reaction of pediatricians against methods used in the years before their young specialty could influence infant care. It is believed that this reaction was justified in the light of developing civilization, which removed men more and more from nature's proved path and thus changed the mother's instinctive acts into those controlled by unfounded rules and superstitions of the time.

Like any new movement, this regimentation of babies proved radical in its initial stages and led to unnatural and unphysiologic conditions in the upbringing of infants. The reaction to this outgrowth of regimentation was the "self-demand schedule,"

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