[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.168.87. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
April 1948

ROOTING REFLEX IN THE NEWBORN INFANT: INCIDENCE AND EFFECT ON IT OF SLEFP

Author Affiliations

Director, Rochester Child Health Institute ROCHESTER, MINN.
From Section on Pediatrics, Mayo Clinic (Dr. Aldrich).

Am J Dis Child. 1948;75(4):528-539. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1948.02030020543003
Abstract

THE HEALTH of the newborn infant depends on an adequate intake of nourishment shortly after he becomes independent of his mother. Therefore, it is of importance to study the various activities which constitute suckling behavior. At the touch of the nipple (1) the infant's lips open; his lower jaw drops so that the nipple can enter his mouth; his lips close about the nipple, and (2) he begins to suck. If this results in the flow of milk or water, he swallows. In addition to the activities just described, there are other specific types of behavior which are said to be related to suckling. One of these types, which is called the "rooting reflex," has been selected for study in addition to the first two acts of suckling: (1) the behavior of the infant's lips when brought into contact with the nipple and (2) actual sucking.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY 

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×