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July 1948

SIGMOIDOSCOPY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ALLERGIC COLITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Pediatrics Service of the Bronx Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1948;76(1):78-82. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1948.02030030085009
Abstract

SINCE ANDERSEN'S1 noteworthy attempts at classification of the diseases comprising the celiac syndrome, it has been possible to individualize dietary and other treatment on a more rational basis. Andersen until recently2 had classified diseases in the celiac syndrome as (a) infantile steatorrhea, (b) intolerance of starch, (b) celiac disease and (d) cystic fibrosis of the pancreas. In 1944, one of us3 had added a fifth classification—an allergic celiac syndrome. At this time it was pointed out that the high percentage of allergic family histories obtainable in cases of metabolic diarrheas makes the diagnosis of allergic celiac syndrome extremely difficult. Many investigators had postulated that gastro-intestinal difficulties may originate in an allergic enterocolitis in which an allergic edema of the gastrointestinal mucosa forms a barrier to the absorption of split fats. Thus, Kunstadter,4 Riley,5 and McKhann6 as well as one of us (J.H.L.)3 had

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