[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 1949

COMPARISON OF THE STABILITY OF REDUCED ASCORBIC ACID IN RAW AND PASTEURIZED MILK

Author Affiliations

AMHERST, MASS.
From the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station.

Am J Dis Child. 1949;78(6):899-902. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1949.02030050918006
Abstract

MILK is frequently referred to as the most perfect natural food, and it is largely relied on for nourishing young mammals, particularly the human infant. Unfortunately, milk is not a complete food and when it constitutes the principal or practically the sole food used, as in the feeding of infants, it is necessary to reenforce it with a number of supplements. Among these is ascorbic acid, which is frequently supplied by the routine feeding of orange juice. Commercial cow's milk, which is ordinarily used as a basis for modified milk formulas for infant feeding, contains only a small portion of its original reduced ascorbic acid. The pasteurization process, especially the holding method (143 F. for thirty minutes), causes a significant loss, and there is a large loss of reduced ascorbic acid from milk during distribution to the ultimate consumer, particularly when the milk is allowed to remain for a long

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×