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Case Reports
September 1950

ACUTE SUPPURATIVE INFECTIONS OF THE SALIVARY GLANDS IN THE NEWBORN

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the departments of pediatrics, St. John's Hospital, and Long Island College Division, Kings County Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1950;80(3):413-416. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1950.04040020424007
Abstract

Acute suppurative infection of the salivary glands, or sialadenitis, is a distinct entity and occurs not infrequently during the first four weeks of life. The clinical syndrome is characterized by swelling of the gland, fever, anorexia, irritability and failure to gain weight. The ultimate diagnostic criterion is the appearance of pus in the oral cavity exuding from the natural opening of the involved salivary gland on gentle external pressure over the gland. Usually a single gland is involved, oftenest the parotid, although all the salivary glands have been reported to be affected.

I am reporting 2 cases of acute infection of a salivary gland occurring in the neonatal period. In the first case the left parotid gland was the seat of the infection, and in the second the right submaxillary gland was involved.

REPORT OF CASES  Case 1.—Baby S. M., a white female infant, was delivered by cesarean section. She

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