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Case Reports
September 1950

TRACHEAL COMPRESSION FROM BRONCHOGENIC CYST IN ESOPHAGEAL WALL

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Surgical Service, Lenox Hill Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1950;80(3):423-426. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1950.04040020434009
Abstract

Respiratory difficulty in infancy and childhood requires thorough investigation and prompt treatment. As experience increases, the list of pathologic conditions known to cause chronic respiratory obstruction is being enlarged. One finds that symptoms of tracheal compression in infancy are all too frequently erroneously attributed to enlargement of the thymus. The case here reported illustrates (1) some differential points in the diagnosis of tumor masses compressing the trachea in early life, (2) the importance of early surgical removal of tumors and cysts, especially when there is any narrowing of the airway, and (3) the fact that intramural tumors of the upper part of the esophagus often cause respiratory rather than esophageal symptoms.

REPORT OF A CASE  D. S., a 2½ year old boy, was admitted to Lenox Hill Hospital on Nov. 26, 1947. The mother had noticed somewhat labored breathing since birth. Palpable rhonchi had been present throughout life. Cyanosis was

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