December 1950


Author Affiliations

Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minn.

AMA Am J Dis Child. 1950;80(6):999-1001. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1950.04040021014016

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To the Editor:—In his letter to the Editor, Dr. H. K. Faber stated that he could see no good reason that transplacental infection need seriously be considered in a case of poliomyelitis (case 1) reported in the July 1950 issue of the American Journal of Diseases of Children by Soule, Mills and me. He noted that we believed the work of Aycock and Luther in 1929 and Casey in 1942 indicated that a five day minimum incubation period in poliomyelitis was a "fairly well established fact" and thought it unfortunate that we had overlooked the more recent paper by Horstmann and Paul, in 1947, in which they state three to 35 days were the extreme intervals between apparent exposure and the onset of clinical symptoms and signs "with many cases developing after a four to ten day period." The report by Horstmann and Paul was not overlooked but was

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