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May 1911

A CONTRIBUTION TO OUR KNOWLEDGE OF THE ETIOLOGY AND NATURE OF HARD CURDS IN INFANTS' STOOLS

Am J Dis Child. 1911;I(5):341-359. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1911.04100050022002
Abstract

The curds that occur in the stools of infants, especially of those fed on cow's-milk, have been the subject of much discussion among pediatricians. A great deal of importance attaches to the solution of the problem of their etiology and nature, because their presence in the stools has always been considered an evidence of an overstepping of the infant's tolerance for the particular food element from which the curds were thought to be derived. The pendulum has swung from the first natural interpretation that they were undigested particles of curdled milk, therefore chiefly protein in origin, to the opposite extreme, if we are to accept the teaching of nearly all the foremost German pediatricians, that the casein takes no part in their formation. From observations that we have made in our clinic at Northwestern University Medical School, and from some experiments that I have made in the past year, I

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