Other Articles
July 1911


Am J Dis Child. 1911;II(1):39-48. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1911.04100070046005

That anaphylaxis has an important bearing on many of the fundamental problems of medicine is indicated by the numerous recent laboratory studies both in this country and abroad. A satisfactory explanation of the phenomena would doubtless clear up a large number of diseases, and this is especially true of those occurring in early life. Questions of anaphylaxis and immunity are closely associated, and a better knowledge of the former would lead to progress in the latter.

Auer and Lewis have demonstrated that the immediate cause of death in sensitive guinea-pigs reacting to a second injection of antigen is asphyxia, due to tetanic contractions of the smooth muscles of the bronchioles, and that this contraction is probably peripheral rather than central in origin. Schultz has in a measure confirmed this view by showing that horse serum acting in vitro on excised smooth muscle fiber from a guinea-pig sensitized to horse-serum causes

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