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February 1912


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Am J Dis Child. 1912;III(2):107-111. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1912.04100140040004

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It is of the greatest importance that those who preside over the physical destinies of children should understand that squint in children is curable. By squint I mean the common form of concomitant convergent strabismus, or "cross-eyes." There are other forms of squint occurring in children which are not curable except through operative measures, but they are comparatively rare.

When I state that the common squint is curable, I mean that it may be cured by non-operative measures, but the pediatrist must understand that the cure depends on the early institution of the proper measures and their implicit observance. The responsibility for allowing children to become adults with eyes crossed and loss of function in one eye — an eye otherwise normal — must be shared by three persons, whom I name in the order of their importance.

First, the parents. Many parents have a false pride which leads them

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