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May 1912

THE EFFECT OF COLD FRESH AIR ON THE BLOOD-PRESSURE IN PNEUMONIA OF CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS; NEW YORK
From the Children's Service of the First Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital, New York.

Am J Dis Child. 1912;III(5):294-303. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1912.04100170019003
Abstract

It is the general impression of those who have treated children with pneumonia out of doors, or in cold rooms with good ventilation, that, in addition to the increased quiet of the patients and their greater tendency to sleep, the circulatory system is not so profoundly affected and stimulation is less frequently required. Any positive evidence in regard to these impressions has been, however, so far as we are aware, lacking.

In a study of the effects of various circulatory stimulants it was found that a child of 5 years with a febrile pneumonia who received a subcutaneous injection of 1 grain of camphor immediately after being brought in from a balcony in winter, suffered no rise in blood-pressure such as would be expected from the camphor, but on the contrary a decided fall and this fall continued for an hour. As a result of this experience it was decided

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