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July 1912

TUBERCULOSIS OF THE MESENTERIC GLANDS IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN; ITS EFFECT ON ABSORPTION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Children's Medical Service, Massachusetts General Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1912;IV(1):49-56. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1912.04100190052010
Abstract

Our conception of tuberculosis in early childhood has been modified by the work of various investigators, whose experiments seem to show that the common channel of infection is not so much the air passages, as the intestinal mucosa. The tubercle bacilli may pass through the intestinal wall, be carried by the lymphatics to the mesenteric glands, and thence into the thoracic duct and blood stream. These views do not reject the older hypothesis that the bacilli are borne by dust into the lungs.1 Von Behring2 says that "the milk fed to infants is the chief cause of consumption," but he also says that it is absolutely important to keep a coughing consumptive away from a nursing infant.

Corner3 finds tuberculous mesenteric glands in the majority of children on whom he has performed a laparotomy, and believes that a large percentage of children have such lesions. He explains

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