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October 1914

THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF "LATE" HEREDITARY SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Pediatrics, Washington University Medical School and the St. Louis Children's Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1914;VIII(4):283-291. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1914.04300010291004
Abstract

RELATION OF "EARLY" TO "LATE" SYPHILIS

During the past two years we have seen 123 cases of manifest hereditary syphilis at the St. Louis Children's Hospital. Of these seventy-four, or 60 per cent., belonged to the group commonly described as "late" hereditary syphilis while only forty-nine, or 40 per cent., were infants under 1 year of age with the classical symptoms of rash, coryza, and enlarged spleen which characterize the "early" type. The division into "early" and "late" is arbitrary and only a matter of convenience, as these "early" symptoms may first develop after infancy, while "late" lesions may develop early in infancy. The "late" lesions may also develop primarily in older children without any "early" lesion having occurred or been recognized. Thus lesions comparable with the secondary (eruptive), tertiary (gummatous), and quarternary or para-syphilitic (vascular and nervous lesions), stages of acquired syphilis, are included among the clinical manifestations of

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