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October 1915

STUDIES IN THE ADAPTATION OF AN ARTIFICIAL FOOD TO HUMAN MILK

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND, O.
From the Babies' Dispensary and Hospital, the Departments of Pediatrics, Chemistry and Biochemistry of Western Reserve University, and from the Walker-Gordon Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio.

Am J Dis Child. 1915;X(4):249-265. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1915.04110040022002
Abstract

Introduction by H. J. Gerstenberger  In 1910, the physiologist, Friedenthal1 again picked up the threads which led to the ideal set up by the pediatrist Biedert a generation ago; namely, to the production of an artificial milk similar in all its important characteristics to the best food for the human infant, namely, breast milk. By not getting the results that it had expected from mixtures which took into consideration the quantities of protein, lactose, and fat in human milk, the pediatric world became discouraged and considered the production of an artificial human milk that would give good practical results a hopeless task. Friedenthal gathered courage for another attempt for the solution of this important and interesting problem from the fact that the salt content and the physical-chemical characteristics of human milk had been entirely neglected, and also from the conviction that these were important, if not the most important

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