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May 1916

THE PERMEABILITY OF THE GASTRO-ENTERIC TRACT OF INFANTS TO UNDIGESTED PROTEIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; HARTFORD, CONN.
From the Laboratory of Biological Chemistry of Columbia University, at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital, New York.

Am J Dis Child. 1916;XI(5):342-360. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1916.04110110035005
Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION  The possible absorption of unaltered or incompletely digested protein is a question of more than academic interest. It is well established that the introduction of foreign protein into the circulation may provoke certain specific reactions (formation of precipitins, sensitization, etc.). Nutritional disturbances in infants fed on cow's milk have been attributed to the biologic character of the food. According to our present conceptions the specific biologic properties of animal tissues reside in great part, if not entirely, in the protein constituents. It is generally believed, however, that the proteins are split into amino-acids before absorption. If such is universally true, biologic reactions to cow's milk would be unlikely, as it has been demonstrated that specificity is lost in protein cleavage products lower than the peptones.Ganghofer and Langer1 found that the intestinal tract of young animals permitted the passage of heterologous protein (beef, egg) as determined by

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