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Symposium on Syphilis
October 1916

CLINICAL COURSE AND PHYSICAL SIGNS IN HEREDITARY SYPHILIS OF EARLY AGE

Am J Dis Child. 1916;XII(4):364-373. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1916.04110160033004
Abstract

Even a casual reading of modern textbooks shows a marked and irreconcilable variation in the descriptions of infantile syphilis. It seems wiser, therefore, to write only of such portions of the subject as have come within personal experience, rather than to attempt a finished treatise, which must, of necessity, include quotations or adaptations from others. This paper will therefore contain few quotations and few conjectures or theories, and will show very serious omissions, if one expects an exhaustive treatment of the subject.

The terms applied to syphilis of the infant need definition: "Infantile syphilis" includes hereditary, congenital and early-acquired syphilis. "Hereditary syphilis," strictly used, refers only to those cases in which the parents, one or both, were syphilitic at the time of conception. "Congenital syphilis" refers to those cases in which the mother is infected during pregnancy.

The last two terms are often used interchangeably, and the distinction between the

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