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Clinical Department
May 1918

XANTHOCHROMIA OF THE SPINAL FLUID WITH COMPLETE COAGULATION IN TUBERCULOUS MENINGITIS

Author Affiliations

Late Resident Physician of the Babies' Hospital NEW YORK

Am J Dis Child. 1918;XV(5):348-350. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1918.04110230037005
Abstract

During the last fifteen years the occurrence of xanthochromia (yellow discoloration) of the cerebrospinal fluid has been noted by several observers. Sprunt and Walker1 have recently collected 100 examples from the literature which showed this condition. They have divided the cases with this variety of spinal fluid into two main groups: (1) those in which the color is due to dissolved hemoglobin or its derivatives; these fluids, as a rule, do not coagulate spontaneously and contain only a small amount of globulin; they are usually associated with tumors of the brain in contact with the meninges, or tumors originating in the ventricles; (2) the larger and more important group which comprise those cases showing the so-called "Froin syndrome." The fluid in this group is transparently clear, yellow, coagulates spontaneously and contains a large amount of globulin; it may or may not show pleocytosis, and it gives no positive reaction

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