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Article
October 1912

BLOOD-CULTURES DURING LIFE IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN, WITH DESCRIPTION OF A NEW TECHNIC

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Pathological Laboratory of the Babies' Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1912;IV(4):197-204. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1912.04100220002001
Abstract

Blood cultures made during life in young infants may be an aid to diagnosis or to prognosis, or they may be useful in the study of a given disease from the purely scientific standpoint, with a view to an ultimate practical or therapeutic application. In either case a safe and simple technic is a matter of necessity. It is probably true that the difficulties hitherto encountered in obtaining blood from young infants in quantities sufficient to make the cultural results of value are responsible for the lack of application of the measure in routine practice. The literature on the subject is very meager and is confined almost entirely to cultures taken from older children. In Churchill and Clark's1 series of sixty-three blood cultures taken from children during life, only nine were under 2 years of age and none was under 12 months. They obtained the blood from a vein

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