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Article
February 1915

THE ENERGY METABOLISM OF TEN HOSPITAL CHILDRENBETWEEN THE AGES OF TWO MONTHS AND ONE YEAR

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; DETROIT
From the Physiological Laboratory of Cornell University Medical College and the Children's Wards of Bellevue Hospital, New York City.

Am J Dis Child. 1915;IX(2):81-119. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1915.04100440002001
Abstract

INTRODUCTION In a study of the energy requirement of the new-born child by Bailey and Murlin,1 it has been shown that when exposed to a temperature between 26 and 29 C. the sleeping infant falls far short of producing as much heat per unit of body surface as does the adult. It was seen also that a thin baby produced more heat per unit of surface and much more per unit of weight than a fat baby of the same age placed under exactly the same circumstances. These differences were so striking as to suggest a further study of the metabolism of children of different weights and of different ages, with special reference to the influence of body fat on the heat production. Aside from hereditary influences on the body size, the chief cause of difference in weight of normal infants at birth, or, for that matter, at any

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