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Article
August 1915

SOME STUDIES ON SUGAR IN INFANT FEEDING

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO; BOSTON

Am J Dis Child. 1915;X(2):77-86. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1915.04110020002001
Abstract

Some years ago Finkelstein1 caught the attention of the world by formulating a new conception of the underlying causes of what were then considered diseases of gastro-intestinal origin. He described them as purely nutritional disturbances, divorced them from any relationship with the bacterial invaders of the intestine, and laid the blame of their genesis on an element of diet that had heretofore been considered innocuous, namely, the sugar. Especially did he attribute that serious, acute form of infantile disease accompanied by stupor, mellituria, and fever to the sugars. The last two symptoms were, he taught, directly and proportionately due to its presence in the food. Later, he implicated the mineral salts of cows' milk, still later prepared his celebrated "Eiweissmilch" and offered it as a remedial food for sugar intoxications, apparently overlooking the fact that as this mixture contained 1.5 per cent. of the deadly lactose its use in practice

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