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Article
April 1924

STUDIES ON ANEMIA IN INFANCY: THE UROBILIN CONTENT OF THE STOOLS OF NORMAL INFANTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the pediatric service of the New York Nursery and Child's Hospital, and the Department of Pediatrics, Cornell University Medical College.

Am J Dis Child. 1924;27(4):297-302. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1924.01920100002001
Abstract

During the past decade the problem of the anemias has been approached by new paths. Interest centers not so much in the morphology as in the physiology of the blood, the way the hematopoietic system performs its function. The function of the blood forming organs is to preserve the hemoglobin, and the red and white cells at a certain level. This stability is maintained by a balance between two opposing forces; the continuous destruction of blood cells is compensated by an equivalent regeneration.

There is no single criterion of blood regeneration. When the percentage of hemoglobin, and the number of red and white cells fall within normal limits, and there are no abnormal cells in the blood stream, blood regeneration may be considered normal. The presence in the circulation of immature cells reflects the degree of strain under which the bone marrow is working. Nucleated forms, normoblasts and megaloblasts, indicate

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