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Article
July 1927

THE INFLUENCE OF PATHOLOGY ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PEDIATRICS

Am J Dis Child. 1927;34(1):1-22. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1927.04130190008001
Abstract

The origin of pathologic anatomy may be traced to the earliest human record. The ancient Egyptians and Greeks had at least a slight conception of this subject. Pliny states that the kings of Egypt ordered the bodies of the dead opened so that physicians might find the diseases responsible for death. The writings of Aristotle and Hippocrates contain several passages which show that in their time human bodies were dissected. When the scepter of supremacy in medicine passed from the Greeks to the Arabians, dissection received but scant attention. The ancients, whether one refers to the illustrious East Indian or Arabian physicians, to Hippocrates himself or to Galen, had little if any conception of morbid changes in the body; but occasionally some historian has detected a flash of wisdom about pathology in their writings.

Hippocrates recognized caput succedaneum and cephalhematoma. He described congenital malformations such as dislocations of the hip

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