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Article
February 1928

EOSINOPHIL CELLS IN THE BLOOD OF NORMAL AND OF ASTHMATIC CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

Formerly Assistant Physician to the Children's Department, Rigshospitalet COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

Am J Dis Child. 1928;35(2):171-185. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1928.01920200003001
Abstract

NORMAL CHILDREN  While it is commonly agreed that the number of eosinophil cells in adults is normally about from 2 to 4 per cent, the greatest uncertainty prevails with regard to children. Most authors state that the number of eosinophil cells is larger in children than it is in adults (Zappert,1 Gundobin,2 Carstanjen,3 Rabinowitsch,4 Schmidt5 and others). A few writers (Rosenstern,6 Putzig7 and others) state, however, that the number of eosinophils is the same in healthy children as it is in adults; they consider the high values found by other writers due to the fact that the children examined were not healthy. The question with which I am concerned here, however, is not so much the reason for the high values, as it is the nature of the blood picture in apparently healthy or normal children.In order to elucidate this matter, I

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