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Article
August 1930

ENCEPHALOGRAPHY IN CASES WITH FIXED LESIONS OF THE BRAIN

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Medical and Roentgenologic Departments of the Children's Hospital and the Departments of Pediatrics and Roentgenology of the Harvard Medical School.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;40(2):227-246. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01940020003001
Abstract

Encephalography involves the removal of cerebrospinal fluid and its replacement by air. This is definitely a formidable procedure and is probably uniformly followed by a meningeal reaction. In this paper we report our experience with this admittedly severe method of study as it was applied to a group of children with supposedly fixed lesions of the central nervous system. We believe that the method reveals information of great value, and that as a result treatment can be carried out more promptly and more adequately in many cases.

It is unnecessary to discuss the literature in any detail, since Pancoast and Fay summarized it in a recent article.1 The daring and effective investigations of Dandy are of course fundamental.

Two major methods of introducing air into the spaces usually occupied by fluid have been used: the introduction into the ventricles by direct puncture and the introduction through a needle in

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