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Article
November 1930

THE EFFECT OF PHOSPHORUS IN RICKETSI. ROENTGENOLOGIC CHANGES IN RICKETS FOLLOWING ADMINISTRATION OF PHOSPHORUS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, University of Chicago.

Am J Dis Child. 1930;40(5):941-967. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1930.01940050003001
Abstract

The study of phosphorus and calcium metabolism is of vital interest to the clinician who desires to understand the physiology and the pathology of bone. In considering the value of elementary phosphorus in the prevention or in the control of rickets, one is reopening a discussion which is both interesting in its concept and intriguing in the contradictory evidence which the various groups of investigators of the past fifty years have found in their clinical and laboratory experiments.

During the early years of the match industry pathologists not infrequently encountered instances of phosphorus poisoning. Wegner1 found that the bones of patients who died of chronic phosphorus poisoning were often hardened and enlarged, while the bones of those whose deaths were due to more acute phosphorus poisoning showed softening and necrosis. He undertook an experimental study of the effect of minute quantities of yellow phosphorus on the bones of growing

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