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Article
October 1932

DIAMETER OF RED BLOOD CELLS OF PREMATURE INFANTS AND OF THOSE BORN AT FULL TERM

Author Affiliations

AMSTERDAM, HOLLAND

Am J Dis Child. 1932;44(4):701-717. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1932.01950110003001
Abstract

The diameter of the erythrocytes is a factor to which of late years more and more attention has been paid, especially in judging different anemias. Under normal conditions the diameter of the red cells can be changed by various influences, which have been extensively discussed among others by Wintrobe.1 The most important modifications in size are those resulting from changes in the carbonic acid tension of the blood caused by alterations in the oxygen tension of the atmosphere or by other influences. The importance of this factor also appears from the constant difference in size between the erythrocytes in arterial and in venous blood, a fact on which Hamburger laid great stress years ago. Under pathologic conditions one observes an anisocytosis with, as a rule, a high microcytosis as a rather typical symptom in acholuric jaundice (Gänsslen2), and a still more extensive anisocytosis with preponderating megalocytosis in tropical

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