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Article
April 1939

ANAPHYLACTOGENIC PROPERTIES OF CERTAIN CEREAL FOODS AND BREADSTUFFSALLERGENIC DENATURATION BY HEAT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pediatrics, New York University, and the Children's Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital.

Am J Dis Child. 1939;57(4):739-758. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1939.01990040003001
Abstract

Although there may be a vast amount of disagreement with respect to the underlying mechanism of allergy and the diagnostic procedures to be employed, it is generally agreed that the method of choice in the first stage of treatment of food allergy is the exclusion of the offending food from the patient's diet. If the patient is sensitive to a single food, the problem is comparatively simple. Multiple sensitivity presents a more difficult situation. It is obvious that wholesale elimination of various genera of food substances may give rise to nutritional and psychogenic disturbances, particularly in infancy and in childhood. Substitution has been tried as an alternative measure with only fair success, perhaps mainly for the reason that the chief offenders are milk, wheat and egg, for which adequate substitutes are not readily found. The problem, therefore, is to find a better way to cope with the situation.

The fact

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