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Article
May 1940

CONGENITAL CRANIAL OSTEOPOROSIS: ITS ETIOLOGY AND SIGNIFICANCEA STUDY OF EIGHT HUNDRED NEWBORN INFANTS

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Pediatrics of the Los Angeles County General Hospital, through the Michael J. Connell Fellowship in Pediatrics of the University of Southern California.

Am J Dis Child. 1940;59(5):931-1001. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1940.01990160003001
Abstract

The present study, clinical and statistical, was undertaken with the hope of throwing more light on the etiology and significance of congenital cranial softening, known variously as congenital craniotabes, craniocranio- "vertex softening" and osteoporosis.1

The significance of this condition, a question much debated in pediatric literature, has been the object of numerous investigations undertaken in an attempt to determine its relation to rickets and to the later, or postnatal, craniotabes.

Much less work, however, has been done in the field of the etiology of congenital cranial softening, and although considerable light has already been thrown on the subject, it is still in a state of vast confusion and controversy, which justifies the present study.

Of what interest and value may an investigation of this kind be? First, congenital cranial softening is a common clinical finding, occurring in from 10 to 35 per cent of all newborn infants; secondly, it

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