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Article
October 1945

INFECTIVITY OF THE PRIMARY COMPLEX OF TUBERCULOSIS OF CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Experimental Medicine, Mayo Foundation, and the Section on Pediatrics, Mayo Clinic.

Am J Dis Child. 1945;70(4):201-206. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1945.02020220002001
Abstract

Rich,1 in his recently published critical review of the evidence for the existence of acquired resistance to tuberculosis in the human being, emphasized particularly two circumstances that provide strong support for the premise that acquired resistance not only is possible but actually exists. One concerns the generally accepted observation that the establishment and subsequent arrest of the primary complex are seldom followed by the occurrence and development of similar lesions even though opportunities for fresh extraneous infection are great. The second circumstance concerns the sequence of events that characterize the development and subsequent regression of the lesions of the primary complex in the great majority of instances. These lesions eventually cease to be progressive, become surrounded by connective tissue elements and if caseous eventually calcify. Rich, therefore, logically assumed that factors of resistance that were either absent or inadequate when the lesions were initiated are in most instances, as

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